Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Wines whose label does not indicate the name of the winery or the winemaker are referred to as “cleanskin” wine.

LOREM IPSUM DOLOR SIT AMET

Sweetness is particularly inconsistent, with some countries’ manufacturers always indicating it in standardized fashion in their language

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Some traditionally not mentioning it at all or referring to it informally and vaguely in a rear-label description.

LOREM IPSUM DOLOR SIT AMET

And yet other countries’ regulators requiring such information to be included (commonly on a secondary label).

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

In certain cases of conflicting regulations, a wine may, for example, even be labelled “sweet”, but also “semi-sweet”.

LOREM IPSUM DOLOR SIT AMET

Most New World consumers, and increasingly Europeans, prefer to buy wine with varietal labels and/or with brand name labels.

Some wineries place great importance on the label design while others do not. There are wineries that have not changed their label’s design in over 60 years, as in the case of Château Simone, while others hire designers every year to change it. Labels may include images of works by Picasso, Chagall, and other artists, and these may be collector’s pieces. The elegance of the label does not determine the wine’s quality. Instead, it is the information contained within the label that can provide consumers with such knowledge. Most New World consumers, and increasingly European consumers, prefer to purchase wine with varietal labels and/or with brand name labels. A recent study of younger wine drinkers in the U.S. found that they perceived labels with châteaux on them to be stuffy or old-fashioned. Producers often attempt to make selecting and purchasing wine easy and non-intimidating by making their labels playful and inviting. The financial success of New World wine attributed to striking label designs has led some European producers to follow suit, as in the case of the redesign of Mouton Cadet.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

To better reach the market of blind or sight-impaired wine consumers, labels have appeared printed in Braille.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Currently the only known winemaker who has taken the initiative to print all their labels in Braille is Chapoutier winery in France.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Other wineries in a number of countries have followed Chapoutier’s lead and have braille available on at least some of their bottles.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

To better reach the market of blind or sight-impaired wine consumers, labels have appeared printed in Braille.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Currently the only known winemaker who has taken the initiative to print all their labels in Braille is Chapoutier winery in France.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Other wineries in a number of countries have followed Chapoutier’s lead and have braille available on at least some of their bottles.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

To better reach the market of blind or sight-impaired wine consumers, labels have appeared printed in Braille.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Currently the only known winemaker who has taken the initiative to print all their labels in Braille is Chapoutier winery in France.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Other wineries in a number of countries have followed Chapoutier’s lead and have braille available on at least some of their bottles.

Tabs without scrolling

Wine classification systems differ by country. Wines can be classified by region and area only. For example, there are 151 châteaux in Bordeaux with “Figeac” and 22 estates in Burgundy with “Corton” on their labels. In Burgundy, there are 110 appellations in an area only one-fifth the size of Bordeaux. Complicating the system is the fact that it is common for villages to append the name of their most famous vineyard to that of the village. In Spain and Portugal, the authenticity of the wine is guaranteed by a seal on the label or a band over the cork under the capsule. This is promulgated by the growers’ association in each area. German wine labels are particularly noted for the detail that they can provide in determining quality and style of the wine. Almost every New World wine is labelled by grape variety and geographic origin. Semi-generic designations were once quite common in countries such as Australia and the USA, but the wine authorities in areas such as Champagne have not been afraid to bring lawsuits against the use of their names outside their region, and semi-generic names are falling out of use.

A wine label may include the producer, the bottler and the merchant’s names. The bottler’s name must always be included in the label. The importer’s name must be included in the label only for countries outside the Common Market.
A wine label may include the producer, the bottler and the merchant’s names. The bottler’s name must always be included in the label. The importer’s name must be included in the label only for countries outside the Common Market.
A wine label may include the producer, the bottler and the merchant’s names. The bottler’s name must always be included in the label. The importer’s name must be included in the label only for countries outside the Common Market.
Labels may include terms that may be perceived as misleading. The term Blanc de blancs may be included in a label. This term means “white wine made from white grapes”. The fact is that white wines are predominantly made from white grapes, with the exception of many sparkling wines, the common use of the red Pinot noir in Champagne wines being a typical example.
Labels may include terms that may be perceived as misleading. The term Blanc de blancs may be included in a label. This term means “white wine made from white grapes”. The fact is that white wines are predominantly made from white grapes, with the exception of many sparkling wines, the common use of the red Pinot noir in Champagne wines being a typical example.
Labels may include terms that may be perceived as misleading. The term Blanc de blancs may be included in a label. This term means “white wine made from white grapes”. The fact is that white wines are predominantly made from white grapes, with the exception of many sparkling wines, the common use of the red Pinot noir in Champagne wines being a typical example.